Tag Archives: print

No Shortcuts Makes a Terrific New “Recommended Reading” List in Paste Magazine!

The article is called, These are the Seven Books You Need to Understand (and Fight) the Age of Trump. About my book, the author starts with:

“Imagine if you didn’t know how to play basketball, and all anyone told you was “pick and roll!” For someone new to political work, this is what the calls to “get organized” can sometimes feel like. Thankfully, in the most nitty-gritty book here, veteran labor and community organizer Jane McAlevey provides a series of case studies that detail exactly what successful organizers do.”

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A Really Thoughtful Book Review Just in From Australia

“Organising”, says Jane McAlevey, “is fundamentally about having hard conversations with people and not running away from hard issues.” Her latest book, No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age, is true to this sentiment. In it, McAlevey outlines a critique of most contemporary union campaigning, using case studies and other analysis to argue in favour of a deeper and more rigorous approach to organising. While McAlevey’s experience and examples are primarily from a union context, her insights are highly transferrable.

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Jacobin Just Posted a Second Good Book Review, Stopping Labor’s Backward March

“Readers of No Shortcuts will encounter a book that is markedly different [than her first book], but insightful in new ways, because McAlevey draws from her case studies to develop theory for the rest of us — not in the academic sense, but in the practical one: insights from experience that can inform our strategy going forward.

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On My Recent Trip Down Under, the Sydney (Australia) Morning Herald Declared

“Jane McAlevey is ready to fight because she sure as hell is not ready to lose.”

“As McAlevey puts it, democracy is messy and to do it well requires really conscious, hard work. And that’s from everyone involved, whether you belong to a political party, to a union, or to any other entity which is trying to protect and to rebuild progressive values as they come under attack.”

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